Virtual Camping for Writers

Camp-2017-Participant-Facebook-CoverI live in a rural area in North Carolina; networking with writers involves driving to the next two larger towns or even the next county.

So, for the month of July, I joined Camp NaNoWriMo, a virtual writing community that encourages writing 50,000 words in 31 days. The venture is sponsored by the same folks who put on National Novel Writing Month every November. It’s free and anyone can join a virtual cabin at www.campnanowrimo.org. You write where you are, without physically going anywhere.

I’m in a virtual cabin led by a Virginia writer who created a closed Facebook group for easier reporting in each day.

I only wrote 800 words on my first day, but it is 800 more words that I would have without the accountability.

In addition, I’m hosting weekly write-ins at a coffee shop, Grapes & Grounds, 135 S Third Street in Smithfield, NC, every Thursday in July from 4 to 6 pm (July 6, 13, 20 and 27). I met several wonderful local writers doing this last November during the regular NaNoWriMo. One has since moved to South Carolina. The other raises pigs and goats on a Pine Level farm, and is writing and illustrating a children’s book. If you’re local, join me at Grapes & Grounds on Thursdays.

Otherwise, I wish you virtual success at Camp NaNoWriMo!

 

Popular columnist shares humor, honesty over coffee

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Barry Saunders reads from his second book, “…And the Horse You Rode in on, Saunders!” Event organized by Mountaintop Productions Public Relations, Smithfield.

National Novel Writing Month, and our final write-in, ended with a great plot twist on Tuesday, Nov. 29.

 

Writers Gary Ridout, Evelyn Wool, Hope Dougherty and I were finishing our labors at Grapes & Grounds coffee shop in Smithfield, N.C., when in walked award-winning Raleigh News & Observer columnist Barry Saunders!

Saunders was there to discuss his book, …And the Horse You Rode in On, Saunders! The book is a compilation of his columns from 1995-2005.

We joined the gathering crowd and listened as Saunders spun stories and shared the humor and honesty of 23 years of toiling in newsrooms. The biggest surprise? He loves it when people criticize his columns. If he’s not being challenged, he doesn’t think he’s doing his job. He knows he has a tough audience to please, and works hard not to be predictable.

I started reading Saunders when I moved to Pine Level two years ago. His columns were a window on my new environs, where some locals called me “Miss Cindy” or “Suge” while others were taking a raised-fist stand on HB2, voting rights, eminent domain. All his subjects were relevant in my little corner.

The Saunders column that cemented my subscription to the N&O was “Writing Salvaged My Life,” (February 8, 2015). His subject was Shelby Stephenson, who grew up on a farm in Benson and was, at the time, being installed as North Carolina Poet Laureate. After reading an earlier column (Saunders: “If it weren’t for my danged deadline, I’d still gladly be listening to Shelby Stephenson’s stories.”) I drove to Raleigh to witness the installation myself. I can’t tell you how thrilling it was to stand under the state capitol dome, in a chamber filled with educators and literary hall of famers and see a humble writer so honored.

Saunders wrote: “Stephenson said he sometimes reads publicly, often with other noted Tar Heel poets as Jaki Shelton Green. ‘She’s always getting on me for writing about possums,’ he said, laughing at the gentle rebukes. ‘I’ve written two books about possums. We ate so many of them growing up that I try to give back to the possum community.’”

He also quoted Stephenson: “Creativity is in each of us. It’s not something just a few people have.”

Saunders made me realize how accessible Stephenson is. So I asked the laureate to speak to our writers group in Selma, which he did. Stephenson also traveled to my former hometown of Manassas, Virginia, where he participated in a poetry event, “In the Company of Laureates,” at the Hylton Performing Arts Center that involved five state poets laureate and others, which a fellow writer, June Forte, arranged in October 2015.

Tuesday night, Saunders shared with the gathering at Grapes & Grounds about growing up in Rockingham, N.C. and his college days at Morehouse. His first newspaper job at The Atlanta Constitution, was writing obituaries. He said he learned the hard way, that spelling names correctly is vital, “because some people only get their name in the paper twice, when they are born and when they die.” He is still haunted by a hurriedly typed “Rhett” that should have been “Ray.”

Saunders shared that in 23 years of writing columns, he’s had to apologize and “eat crow” about 10 times. He said people respect you when you admit your mistake. And his favorite columns are the ones that produce positive action, like helping an ex-felon find a job or a teenager getting much-needed shoes. His worst column? Well, the title of his book is the tail end of a curse one reader hurled at him after publication of a particularly trouble-stirring one. Saunders joyfully admits his book would make a great holiday gift for friends and enemies alike.

Copies of Saunders’ signed book are available at Grapes & Grounds, located next door to the Howell Theatre at 135 South Third Street in Smithfield, N.C.

If you’d like to meet with other local writers, the Johnston County Writers Group meets the second Thursday of the month at 6:30 pm at the Selma Public Library, 301 N. Pollock Street in Selma. Our next meeting is Dec. 8, 2016.

NaNoWriMo 2016: Your Novel, Your Universe

nanowrimo_2016November is National Novel Writing Month! This is my fourth year participating.

NaNoWriMo is for anyone who has ever thought about writing a novel or non-fiction book. Register and begin your book prep at NaNoWriMo.org. On Nov. 1, participants begin working toward the goal of writing at 50,000-word book by Nov. 30.

One part writing boot camp, one part rollicking party, National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) celebrates its 18th year of encouraging creativity, education, and the power of the imagination through the largest writing event in the world. This year, NaNoWriMo expects nearly 500,000 people—including K-12 students and educators on their brand new Young Writers Program website —to start a 50,000-word novel in the month of November, guided by this year’s theme: Your Novel, Your Universe.

NaNoWriMo in the Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina area

I registered and joined the participants in the Raleigh-Durham region. As of Oct. 30, 387 participants have registered in NaNoWriMo RDU, so you’re not alone, and there are many ways to network to reach your goal. The kickoff party was Oct. 29 at the American Cancer Society in Raleigh and write-ins are planned in Cary, Durham, Apex, Brier Creek and Smithfield throughout the month.

NaNoWrMo in Johnston County, North Carolina

The Johnston County Writers Group is encouraging local participation in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) with four November write-ins at Grapes & Grounds, 135 S Third St, Smithfield. Each write-in is 4pm to 6pm on Thursday, Nov. 3, Thursday, Nov. 10, Tuesday, Nov. 15 and Tuesday, Nov. 29.  Co-hosts are Gary Ridout and myself, Cindy Brookshire.

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Author Hope Dougherty (right), a member of the Johnston County Writers, recently held a book talk at Grapes & Grounds.

Wifi and street parking are available at this cozy coffee shop in historic downtown Smithfield (owners/baristas Patrick and Teresa Yauch sell wine, too). Directions to Grapes & Grounds at www.grapesandgrounds1.com.

The Johnston County Writers Group will still meet at our regular meeting time, 6:30 pm on Nov. 10, the second Thursday of the month, at the Selma Public Library, 301 N. Pollock Street, Selma, NC.

Join us!